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Global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, Rupert Murdoch pictures (pic) and photo gallery.
Birth name: Keith Rupert Murdoch.
Born: March 11, 1931 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Spouse(s):
Wendi Deng (25 June 1999 - present) they have two children.
Anna Maria Torv (1967 - 1999)(divorced) they have three children.
Patricia Booker (1956 - 1960)(divorced) they have one child.
Children: Prudence, Elisabeth, Lachlan, James, Grace and Chloe.

Rupert Murdoch biography (bio):
Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG is an Australian-born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. Beginning with newspapers, magazines and television stations in his native Australia, Murdoch expanded News Corp into British and American media, and in recent years has become a leading investor in satellite television, the film industry, the Internet, and other forms of media.
He is one of the few chief executives of any multinational media corporation who controls the company by reason of his own stake in it, held via a family trust.
Rupert Murdoch was born on March 11, 1931 in Victoria, Australia, and was reading Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Worcester College, Oxford University, when his father, Keith Murdoch, died in 1952.
Before his death Keith Murdoch had accumulated a great number of shares in newspaper companies, including some representing a controlling interest in News Limited, an Adelaide company publishing an afternoon newspaper called The News. He had appointed an experienced journalist named Rohan Rivett, a childhood friend and mentor of Rupert Murdoch, as editor of The News with the hope that Rupert would enter a career in journalism and that Rivett would assist Rupert in learning the required skills. In his will, Keith Murdoch instructed his trustees that Rupert should begin his career at The News "if they consider him worthy of support." At that time Rupert had written in Oxford student newspapers and had worked for a number of newspapers in a junior capacity. Some thought he had little interest in journalism though and noted his enthusiasm for gambling and making money.
At the time of his death Keith Murdoch was heavily in debt but possessed within a private family trust considerable number of newspaper shares, some of which may have actually belonged to the Herald and Weekly Times. The trustees, in consultation with Keith's widow and Rupert's mother, Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, were forced to sell many of the shares and other property in order to repay debt and death duties (government taxes). Elisabeth was able to retain only the family home, Cruden Farm, and the shares in News Limited and its subsidiaries, a Melbourne magazine publishing company named Southdown Press and The Barrier Miner, a newspaper at Broken Hill, New South Wales.

Start of business career:
Rupert Murdoch returned from Oxford to take up his duties as managing director of News Limited in 1953 and immediately developed an enthusiasm for the newspaper business that was not there before. His drive and energy infected the staff and the paper's circulation and advertising revenue began to grow. He began to direct his attention to acquisition and expansion. He bought a rundown Sunday Newspaper in Perth, Western Australia, and, using the tabloid techniques that Northcliffe had taught his son, made it a roaring success.
In 1956 he began publishing Australia's first and most successful weekly television magazine, TV Week, at Southdown Press in Melbourne, which also published Australia's oldest women's magazine New Idea. With the Perth paper, the TV magazine and a re-energised New Idea all providing a steady and improving cash flow he was able to obtain finance for more expansion from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, a government-owned bank dedicated to supporting Australian business development.
A defining moment in Murdoch's life was the Stuart case in Adelaide when The News began a campaign to free a young aboriginal carnival worker named Rupert Max Stuart who had been convicted of the murder of a small girl on a beach near Ceduna in the far west of South Australia during Christmas of 1958. Stuart was sentenced to hang. The News was critical of the case and investigated in an attempt to prove Stuart not guilty. This action raised the ire of Premier Thomas Playford, and after numerous deliberating, and even a Royal Commission, Stuart was spared the death penalty.
To neutralize public emotion on the issue of hanging he commuted Stuart's sentence to life imprisonment and then established a royal commission, conducted by the state's chief judge and the judge who had passed sentence on Stuart. The outcome was a confirmation of Stuart's guilt and a recommendation that The News, its editor and its managing director be charged with sedition, a form of treason based on mediaeval English law. The paper, the editor and Murdoch were each charged on three counts, making nine counts in all.
To fight the nine cases would have bankrupted News Limited. Rupert Murdoch's only chance of saving the family inheritance was an intercession arranged by Ken May, a political reporter on The News. Playford agreed to meet Murdoch in private. Murdoch pleaded his case on the basis of his youth and inexperience and a claim that Rohan Rivett had exerted influence over him. Playford agreed to have the charges dropped on two conditions: (1) That Rivett be fired from the paper and (2) that The News pay the costs of the royal commission. Unable to face Rivett, Murdoch went to Sydney and wrote a terse one-paragraph letter dismissing his long-time friend.
This humiliating experience gave Rupert Murdoch a taste of the overwhelming power of popularly elected politicians and would shape the future policies of all his newspapers. In 2002 Murdoch financed a motion picture "Black and White" which told a varied version of the Stuart story.
Over the next few years, Murdoch established himself in Australia as a dynamic business operator, expanding his holdings by acquiring suburban and provincial newspapers in New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and the Northern Territory. including the Sydney afternoon tabloid, The Daily Mirror, as well as a small Sydney-based recording company, Festival Records. His acquisition of the Daily Mirror allowed him to challenge two powerful rivals in Australia's biggest city and to outwit his afternoon rival in a long circulation war.
In 1964, Murdoch launched The Australian, Australia's first national daily newspaper, based first in Canberra and later in Sydney. The Australian, a broadsheet, was intended to give Murdoch a new respectability as a 'quality' newspaper publisher and greater political influence. The paper had a rocky start, marked by publishing difficulties and a constantly changing succession of editors who found it impossible to deal with Murdoch's persistent interference. Promised as a serious journal of the affairs of the nation, the paper actually veered between tabloid sensationalism and intellectual tedium until Murdoch was able to find a compliant editor who could abide with his often unpredictable predilections.
The departure in 1966 of the Liberal Prime Minister Robert Menzies saw a chaotic six years of politics after Menzies' chosen successor Harold Holt drowned, to be replaced by John Gorton and then William McMahon. In 1972, Murdoch acquired the Sydney morning tabloid The Daily Telegraph. In that year's election, Murdoch threw his growing power behind the Australian Labor Party under the leadership of Gough Whitlam and duly saw it win power. As the Whitlam government suffered a great loss of public support following its 1974 re-election, Murdoch soon turned against Whitlam and supported the Governor-General's dismissal of the Prime Minister.
In the meantime, Murdoch turned his attention overseas. His business success in Australia and his fastidious policy of prompt periodic repayments of his borrowings had placed him in good financial standing with the Commonwealth Bank and he obtained its support for his biggest venture yet, the takeover of a family company which owned The News of the World, the Sunday newspaper with the biggest circulation in Britain.
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